Tag Archives: human

U.N. council to meet subsequent week on human rights in North Korea: U.S.

UNITED NATIONS The United Nations Safety Council will meet subsequent week on human rights in North Korea, which has been accused by a U.N. inquiry of abuses comparable to Nazi-era atrocities, the United States mentioned on Friday.

The meeting will take place on Thursday, Dec. ten at two:30 p.m. (1430 ET), the spokeswoman for the U.S. Mission to the United Nations, Hagar Chemali, stated in a statement. She added that senior U.N. officials would brief the council.

    The other eight council members who supported the U.S. choice to revive discussions on alleged rights abuses in North Korea are Chile, France, Jordan, Lithuania, Malaysia, New Zealand, Spain and Britain, Chemali stated on Thursday.

The Security Council last discussed the problem a year ago.

Last month China’s U.N. ambassador, Liu Jieyi, said it would be a “negative thought” for the Security Council to hold such a meeting, adding that the council “is not about human rights.”

The Safety Council added human rights in North Korea to its agenda final year, in spite of objections by China that led to a rare procedural vote. Beijing is a powerful ally of Pyongyang.

When speaking to reporters final month, Liu did not rule out a new procedural vote, even though Western diplomats say they have adequate votes to overcome Chinese objections.

China’s and North Korea’s U.N. missions did not respond immediately to requests for comment. North Korea has denied allegations of systematic human rights abuses, saying such charges are portion of a U.S.-led plot to destabilize the country.

A year ago this month the 193-member U.N. Basic Assembly urged the U.N. Safety Council to take into account referring North Korea to the International Criminal Court (ICC) following a U.N. Commission of Inquiry detailed wide-ranging abuses in the hermit Asian state.

China is probably to veto any Safety Council bid to refer North Korea to the ICC, diplomats said.

(Reporting by Louis Charbonneau Editing by Sandra Maler)

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Human Rights Watch says best regional researcher barred from Kyrgyzstan

BISHKEK Kyrgyzstan has barred the head of Human Rights Watch’s office in Bishkek from getting into the country, HRW said on Friday, following the group called for the release of a Kyrgyz dissident jailed for life and criticized what it saw as repressive legislation.

The mainly Muslim, Central Asian republic of six million men and women voted in October to hold a pro-Russian celebration coalition in energy, which is most likely to draw Kyrgyzstan additional back into the orbit of its former Soviet master.

New York-based Human Rights Watch said Mihra Rittmann, its Central Asia researcher and Bishkek office director, had been declared “persona non grata” by Kyrgyz authorities and refused entry on Wednesday. HRW described the step as “unprecedented, unexpected, and a deeply disturbing sign”.

A Kyrgyz foreign ministry spokesman said Rittman, a U.S. citizen, had violated immigration laws, but gave no particulars.

Kyrgyz President Almazbek Atambayev accused the United States in July of looking for to “produce chaos” in his nation by granting an award to dissident Azimjon Askarov, jailed for life on charges of inciting ethnic hatred. Kyrgyzstan terminated a cooperation accord with Washington in response.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry sought a rapprochement with ex-Soviet Central Asian leaders when he toured the area in October and November, but accomplished no apparent progress.

Ahead of Kerry’s go to. HRW urged him to press Bishkek to release Askarov and reject draft bills that describe foreign-funded organizations as “foreign agents” and ban “homosexual propaganda”. HRW has also criticized the Kyrgyz government for not doing adequate to address issues such as domestic violence.

The bills in query stay at draft stage.

(Reporting by Olga Dzyubenko Writing by Olzhas Auyezov Editing by Mark Heinrich)

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U.S., allies call for new UN meeting on North Korea human rights

UNITED NATIONS The United States and eight allies on the United Nations Safety Council on Thursday referred to as for reviving discussions on human rights in North Korea, which has been accused by a U.N. inquiry of abuses comparable to Nazi-era atrocities.

“Last year in December the U.N. Safety Council convened for the 1st time in history to talk about the human rights in (North Korea),” Hagar Chemali, spokeswoman for the U.S. mission to the United Nations, stated in a statement.

“Right now, Chile, France, Jordan, Lithuania, Malaysia, New Zealand, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States have requested an additional meeting of the Security Council to examine circumstances in DPRK (North Korea) and their effects on international peace and safety,” she added.

Chemali stated the United States, which holds the council’s rotating presidency this month, would operate rapidly to schedule the meeting.

Final month China’s U.N. ambassador, Liu Jieyi, said it would be a “poor thought” for the 15-nation Safety Council to hold such a meeting, adding that the council “is not about human rights.” [nL1N136007]

The Safety Council added human rights in North Korea to its agenda last year, despite objections by China that led to a uncommon procedural vote. Beijing is a sturdy ally of Pyongyang.

When speaking to reporters last month, Liu did not rule out a new procedural vote, though Western diplomats say they have enough votes to overcome Chinese objections.

China’s and North Korea’s U.N. missions did not respond right away to requests for comment.

A year ago this month the 193-member U.N. Common Assembly urged the U.N. Security Council to take into account referring North Korea to the International Criminal Court following a U.N. Commission of Inquiry detailed wide-ranging abuses in the hermit Asian state.

China is most likely to veto any Security Council bid to refer North Korea to the ICC, diplomats said.

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Energy stated it was crucial to keep council discussions on the situation in North Korea alive.

“We believe it is essential for the council to continue to shine a light on the abuses in North Korea and speak regularly about the DPRK’s human rights circumstance – and what we can do to adjust it – for as long as the crimes committed there persist,” she said in the statement.

(Additonal reporting by Michelle Nichols Editing by Sandra Maler)

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Agen Sabung Ayam – Philip Morris: we are defending our enterprise, not attacking human rights | Letters

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Marc Firestone of Philip Morris International responds to issues about the tobacco firm’s legal action in Uruguay. Photograph: Martin Rickett/PA

Despite emphasising the role of the United Nations in sustaining justice and respect for obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law, Alfred de Zayas (How can Philip Morris sue Uruguay over its tobacco laws?, 16 November) fails to add that the UN defines the rule of law as a principle of accountability and equality for “all persons, institutions and entities, public and private … constant with international human rights, norms and standards”.

There is no inherent tension in defending basic rights of the private sector although defending human rights. There is practically nothing that threatens the globe order of justice as feared by the author. By contrast, what would be “devastating” to public order is if fairness and equal justice have been applied selectively. To paraphrase Orwell, the result would imply that all are equal, but some are more equal than other people.

The investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism is not “little known” or “buried” in trade agreements. Investment protection is an act of sovereignty that results from negotiations between states. Missing from the author’s account of our arbitration with Uruguay is that the Uruguayan senate approved the investment treaty with Switzerland soon after careful scrutiny, and with confidence that its provisions aligned with Uruguay’s domestic law.

The implication that our case has “chilled” governments from enacting tobacco manage guidelines is erroneous. Uruguay itself has banned the show of tobacco goods at retail points of sale, and several other tobacco policy measures have been implemented around the world given that we brought our claim in Uruguay in 2010.

A reminder to calm the rhetoric: PMI has brought only two ISDS situations among over 600 reported instances, and we did not bring them lightly. The Uruguayan government knows that we choose amicable resolutions to litigation and that we remain obtainable for constructive discussion with authorities in Uruguay and elsewhere.

Nations have executed much more than 3,000 investment protection agreements. This reinforces the bedrock principle of international law that investors are entitled to fair and equitable therapy. Governments that respect the rule of law have absolutely nothing to worry from the possibility of independent, objective evaluation of regulatory measures.
Marc Firestone
Senior vice-president and common counsel, Philip Morris International

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